• Tory Anne Brown

A Hard-Boiled Egg-speriment



I must have been bored the other night. I decided to test four different methods to cook the perfect hard-boiled egg. The purpose of the experiment was two-fold: to test the amount of time to get the yolk cooked to perfection, and what needed to be added to the water to achieve perfect peeling capability. The four methods I tried were:

1. No additions to the water but bring the eggs to a boil, then remove from heat and cover for ten minutes before peeling.

2. Add a large slice of lemon to the water, bring the eggs to a boil and set a timer for eight minutes and another for ten minutes.

3. Add ¼ cup of vinegar to the water, bring the eggs to a boil and set a timer for eight minutes and another for ten minutes.

4. Add ¼ cup table salt to the water, bring the eggs to a boil and set a timer for eight minutes and another for ten minutes.

All the eggs in the four steps were placed into cold water in a small pot and brought to a boil. I have learned this is important to keep the eggs from cracking while cooking.

Method #1 was a fail. The yolks weren’t cooked and would not peel at all. In all fairness, I think the eggs might have had a chance to cook more if I had used a larger pot to cook them in, but because I used a size-appropriate pot for four eggs, the water cooled down more quickly than had I used a larger pot of water to cook them in.

Methods two through four all worked mostly well. I had very little difficulty peeling them after they had cooked for ten minutes and then cooled down in cold water immediately after I had taken them off the burner. I checked one egg in each set at eight minutes, but all needed the full ten minutes to cook before the yolks were done. Those eggs are in the front of the second picture.

In conclusion, you can use salt, vinegar, or lemon slices in the water when you cook your eggs; I prefer salt.

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